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Homemade Cream Horns Recipe

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This recipe for cream horns makes delicate, flaky puff pastry cones (aff link) filled with sweet whipped cream. No need to head to a bakery – this easy homemade cream horn recipe is easier to make than you might think! Pastry recipes don't have to be hard to make when you use frozen puff pastry as a shortcut.

Pastry cones filled with cream on a baking sheet

Lisa said: “I’ve made these a couple of times now. I have to make double because we eat them so fast! ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

When I was growing up my dad would sometimes pick up a package of cream horns at the grocery store and I considered that a special treat.

And frankly, I should have – considering it's sugar on top of sugar that I got to consume at breakfast. 

Ever since I moved to New England, I've had a hell of a time even finding them in grocery stores. I've found places where I could order them from a bakery, but nothing that I could just grab and go. And it hurts my little sugar-loving heart, y'all. Hurts.

Thankfully, I've figured out how to make my own – and now you can, too!

What is the cream in cream horns made of?

It's a very simple recipe consisting of heavy cream, vanilla extract, and powdered sugar. The cream filling isn't too creamy, and it isn't too sweet.

What is the pastry for cream horns?

I gave up on making my own pastry and just went with store-bought puff pastry, but frankly I don't have an issue with that. The cream filling is what I was more concerned with.

The pastry isn't too flaky, but it also isn't too thick.

Puff pastry cones filled with whipped cream on a white cake stand

What is the difference between a cannoli and a cream horn?

Cream horns are a puff pastry filled with a sweetened whipped cream.

Cannolis have a fried pastry shell filled with a denser ricotta mixture.

Ingredients for puff pastry cream horns

  • 1 sheet frozen puff pastry, thawed
  • 1 egg, room temperature (for an egg wash)
  • 1 cup powdered sugar, divided
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

How to make cream horns

Making the pastry cones

Puff pastry strips on a cutting board

Step 1: Take out a sheet of puff pastry to let it thaw enough that you can unfold it without it breaking apart. Once thawed, cut the pastry sheet crosswise into nine equal strips. Set aside.

Metal pastry cones freshly sprayed with nonstick canola oil spray on a baking sheet

Step 2: Spray 9 metal pastry cones (aff link) with non-stick spray. Note: If you don't have pastry cones, make your own! Rip off 8-12″ long sheets of aluminum foil, fold in half, and roll each into a cone shape.

Puff pastry strip being wrapped around a metal pastry cone

Step 3: Wind a strip of pastry around each cone, starting at the pointed end and making sure to overlap layers a little so that there aren't any gaps.

Metal pastry cones wrapped with puff pastry strips on a baking sheet

After you've reached the end of the pastry, gently press the end to the top layer of pastry to prevent it from popping off while baking.

Metal pastry cones wrapped with puff pastry strips on a baking sheet

Step 4: Place them in the freezer for 20-30 minutes so that they'll hold their shape while baking.

Metal pastry cones wrapped with puff pastry and brushed with an egg wash

Step 5: Place each pastry, seam side down, 2-3″ apart on each baking sheet – remember, the pastries will expand as they bake and you don't want them to touch. I recommend placing 4 on one baking sheet and 5 on another, placing them on a diagonal across the baking sheets.

Metal pastry cones wrapped with puff pastry and being brushed with an egg wash

Step 6: Create an egg wash by whisking together one egg with a teaspoon of water in a small bowl. Brush the top of each pastry with the egg wash to give them a nice golden brown sheen.

Powdered sugar being dusted on top of pastry cones with a mesh sieve

Step 7: Place 1/4 cup powdered sugar in a flour sifter (aff link) or fine mesh sieve and coat the top of each pastry with a dusting of sugar.

Metal pastry cones with freshly baked pastry on a baking sheet

Step 8: Bake for 15 minutes or until the tops are golden brown. Remove from the oven and allow to cool on baking sheet with the metal forms still inside.

A metal pastry cone sticking out of a tube of golden pastry

You'll notice the forms will have pushed out of the pastries just a bit, due to the expansion of the pastry as it baked.

How to make the cream horn filling

Whipped cream in a clear bowl

While the pastries are cooling, prepare the cream filling. In a large bowl, whip the heavy cream until it forms soft peaks. Add vanilla and remaining 3/4 cup powdered sugar. Whip until it forms stiff peaks. Taste test it and add more powdered sugar if you'd like it a little sweeter.

Pastry cones filled with cream on a baking sheet

Once pastries are completely cooled, fill a piping bag with the cream and squeeze with firm pressure into the pastry cavities. If desired, top with a little powdered sugar or drizzled chocolate. Keep refrigerated and enjoy!

Yes, you have to let them chill!

What I came to realize is that I wasn't going to know if it worked with the pastry until I made the pastry, made the filling, and placed them in the fridge for a while.

I tried one before it went in the fridge to cool both the pastry and the filling, and something didn't seem right.

Then I tried another after it had been in there for a couple hours and it tasted perfect. It brought me right back to my childhood.

If I could have changed into Batman pajamas and sat down in front of the TV with one to watch The California Raisins, I would have. 

How to store cream horns

You need to keep cream horns chilled, so they should be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 days. After that, the shell will start to get soft as it absorbs the cream filling.

Can you freeze cream horns?

Definitely! Place cream horns in single layers with parchment paper between them (optionally, also individually wrapped in plastic wrap) in a freezer-safe airtight container in the freezer for up to 2 months.

They thaw relatively quickly at room temperature or in the fridge, within an hour or so.

Pastry cones filled with cream on a baking sheet

Making DIY pastry cones

I've used aluminum foil to form cones that you'll use to form the pastry around by ripping off 8-12″ long sheets of aluminum foil, folding them in half, and rolling each into a cone shape.

But if you want to be legit about this pick up these pastry cones (affiliate link).

So much easier! It'll save you time and your sanity. You can also use pastry tubes, like you see used for cannolis.

FAQs

Can I make my own pastry cones?

Yes! I've used aluminum foil to form cones that you'll use to form the pastry around by ripping off 8-12″ long sheets of aluminum foil, folding them in half, and rolling each into a cone shape.

Can you freeze cream horns?

Definitely! Place cream horns in single layers with parchment paper between them (optionally, also individually wrapped in plastic wrap) in a freezer-safe airtight container in the freezer for up to 2 months. They thaw relatively quickly at room temperature or in the fridge, within an hour or so.

How to store cream horns

You need to keep cream horns chilled, so they should be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 days. After that, the shell will start to get soft as it absorbs the cream filling.

What is the difference between a cannoli and a cream horn?

Cream horns are a puff pastry filled with a sweetened whipped cream. Cannolis have a fried pastry shell filled with a denser ricotta mixture.

What is the cream in cream horns made of?

It's a very simple recipe consisting of heavy cream, vanilla extract, and powdered sugar. The cream filling isn't too creamy, and it isn't too sweet.

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Homemade Cream Horns Recipe

4.69 from 19 votes
This recipe for cream horns makes delicate, flaky puff pastry cones (aff link) filled with sweet whipped cream. No need to head to a bakery – this easy homemade cream horn recipe is easier to make than you might think! Pastry recipes don't have to be hard to make when you use frozen puff pastry as a shortcut.
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour
Servings: 9 cream horns

Ingredients
 

Instructions

Pastry horns

  • Take out a sheet of puff pastry to let it thaw enough that you can unfold it without it breaking apart. Once thawed, cut the pastry sheet crosswise into nine equal strips. Set aside.
    1 sheet (1) frozen puff pastry
  • Spray 9 metal pastry cones (aff link) with non-stick spray.
    Note: If you don't have pastry cones (aff link), make your own! Rip off 8-12" long sheets of aluminum foil, fold in half, and roll each into a cone shape.
  • Wind a strip of pastry around each cone, starting at the pointed end and making sure to overlap layers a little so that there aren't any gaps. After you've reached the end of the pastry, gentle press the end to the top layer of pastry to prevent it from popping off while baking. Place them in the freezer for 20-30 minutes so that they'll hold their shape while baking.
  • Preheat oven to 400°F and prepare two baking sheets with a non-stick silicone mats or parchment paper.
  • Place each pastry, seam side down, 2-3" apart on baking sheet – remember, the pastries will expand as they bake and you don't want them to touch. I recommend placing 4 on one baking sheet and 5 on another, placing them on a diagonal across the baking sheets.
  • Create an egg wash by whisking together one egg with a teaspoon of water in a small bowl. Brush the top of each pastry with the egg wash to give them a nice golden brown sheen.
    1 egg
  • Place 1/4 cup powdered sugar in a flour sifter (aff link) or fine mesh sieve and coat the top of each pastry with a dusting of sugar.
    1 cup (120 g) confectioners’ sugar (powdered sugar)
  • Bake for 15 minutes or until the tops are golden brown. Remove from the oven and allow to cool on baking sheet with the metal forms still inside. You'll notice the forms will have pushed out of the pastries just a bit, due to the expansion of the pastry as it baked.

Cream filling

  • While the pastries are cooling, prepare the cream filling. In a large bowl, whip the heavy cream until it forms soft peaks.
    1 cup (238 g) heavy cream
  • Add vanilla and remaining 3/4 cup powdered sugar. Whip until it forms stiff peaks. Taste test it and add more powdered sugar if you'd like it a little sweeter.
    1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    1 cup (120 g) confectioners’ sugar (powdered sugar)
  • Once pastries are completely cooled, fill a piping bag with the cream and squeeze with firm pressure into the pastry cavities. If desired, top with a little powdered sugar or drizzled chocolate. Keep refrigerated and enjoy!

Video

Notes

I've used the aluminum foil method, but if you want to be legit about this pick up these pastry cones (affiliate link). So much easier!

Nutrition Facts

Calories: 301kcal | Carbohydrates: 26g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 21g | Saturated Fat: 9g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 9g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 54mg | Sodium: 85mg | Potassium: 44mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 13g | Vitamin A: 415IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 23mg | Iron: 1mg

Nutrition Disclaimer

The provided nutrition information is generated by an automatic API and does not take variations across specific brands into account. This information is provided as a general guideline and should not be treated as official calculations. Learn more here.

Recipe created by Leslie Kiszka

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Recipe Rating




42 Comments

  1. 4 stars
    I don’t know what happened, but somehow I failed making the filling. I whipped the cream exactly as the recipe said and carefully measured the powdered sugar and vanilla. I even chilled it before piping the pasties and yet my cream filling was super runny. I know it’s not a fault in the recipe, this isn’t even my first baking fail this month, but it’s still a little disheartening that I couldn’t get such a simple recipe right. I’m going to attempt this again tomorrow and I think I’ll try chilling the bowl before whipping the cream and see if that makes a difference.

  2. How can you call them homemade? When they are made with boxes puff pastry. It’s just sad when you are looking for a real homemade recipe. To only find most use premade frozen items. At least use a quick pastry dough recipe. There is quite a few out there.
    I usually have to end up just using two different recipes for each item when puff pastry is involved. But you do go to the trouble of homemade cones. But don’t at least post a link to a real pastry dough. Maybe two, one for quick and the other for regular pastry dough. The quick recipes work great and it tastes so much better than frozen boxes dough. Also none of the preservatives or other ingredients you can’t pronounce. Just an idea for those who love baking completely from scratch or can’t afford the store bought dough.

    1. I call them homemade because I made them at home. Sounds like my blog might not be for you as I’m looking to make recipes easier and quicker for my readers and most people feel making their own puff pastry is too time-consuming for them.

      I’d humbly suggest avoiding commenting with complaints and such a negative attitude toward someone who provided a free recipe, and simply seeking out another site that has what your looking for. Happy holidays to you, too.

  3. 5 stars
    Have not made these yet, but I remember from the last century that bakery cream horns were filled with a cooked meringue and maybe that is why the idea of “too sweet” started. Can’t wait to try this recipe

  4. 5 stars
    Hi
    my husband has been pestering me for ages to make him cream horns i just came across your recipe and have free time so am going to have a go and also make the cones

  5. I’ve made these a couple of times now. I have to make double because we eat then so fast! I’m trying with chocolate mixed into the filing next time!

  6. I just bought some cream horns at a bakery. They were good, but So Super Sweet,I got a stomach ache after eating two of them. I love “Sweet”, but it was too much. Is the recipe for filling that you use super sweet as well?

    1. Hi Amy – if you read the body of my post I note that I also share your concern for *too* sweet a filling! I find that mine is just the right amount of sweetness paired with the pastry, but if you wanted to try it with less powdered sugar to start and taste it until you’ve added the amount that suits your need that will work as well. Good luck!

  7. I see these filled with lemon or a custard. Any suggestions as to how to make this filling?

  8. 5 stars
    My oven is not always reliable, so I needed to reduce the temp by 5 degrees and bake for a shorter amount of time. They turned out perfect and tasty — just the way I remember them as a kid! Thanks so much for offering a recipe for cream horns that uses real whipped cream!

    1. Thank you so much for coming back to leave a comment and a rating – it’s totally a nostalgia trip every time I make them – brings me right back to being a kid!

  9. I followed your recipe and the pastry horns were on the tough side on the bottom. I did cook them for 22 mins. I did use puff pastry dough. The cream was just right, delicious and they looked pretty

  10. Here’s a tip for the cones..take sugar cones and wrap them in foil, then wrap the pastry around them..Theu hold the shape way better this way…and you can eat the molds..

    1. I inherited my mother-in-law’s recipe for cream horns and she use old fashioned clothes pins for the horns. I switched to wooden dowels cut to the size I want. It’s much easier to take the dough off.

  11. My daughter loves cream horns. I made the shells and was going to fill the nextdaybut she was sick so can I freeze the empty horns and how long will they keep in the freezer?

  12. Hello, thanks for giving us this special recipe. Just a question, how do you remove the foil? My daughter and I tried and it all crumbled apart trying to get the foil out. Thanks again!

    1. I’m sorry to hear you struggled with removing the foil! I’ve honestly never had any trouble with it as it’s always come right out. Did you spray them with nonstick spray beforehand?

  13. These were perfect, so much better than store bought. My entire family said they were delicious, gkids, dil, husband. Not to sweet.

  14. Hi my name i s Patty. Does the cream horn cream taste like puff pastry filling or like the sugary cream like youd find I Ring dings. That certain sugary cream flavor?

  15. This is just what I was looking for…especially love the tips to make your own molds! How long will these keep in the fridge? If you fill them too soon would they get soggy?

  16. I’m not sure ,what’s the taste for heavy cream ? I use it but not in cakes really,does it have any weird taste ?